Winter solstice wheel

As we enter 2017, multimedia artist Maralie offers her profound meditations on loss, transitions, and moving from darkness into light. Her father passed away recently, with the service honoring his life falling on winter solstice, December 21st, 2016.

Maralie created the below video and text work 'Winter Solstice Wheel' as a part of her ritual of honoring ancestors and letting go. 'Winter Solstice Wheel' is a powerful reminder of how after the darkest and coldest, the wheel continues spinning. 


The Sun moved so slowly
moved so slowly, so slowly,
so slow
as if standing still
succumbing to the longest night

Yule
the wheel continues spinning
we are returned
one Eternal round
the Sun is reborn after Winter Solstice

Evergreens
Pine, Rosemary, Bay, Juniper, and Cedar
ever - green
like the season waxing nearer should we survive
the darkest and coldest
we are returned
one Eternal round
the Sun is reborn

Ceased breathing
in the labor of dying
silver cord is loosed
and the spirit returns
the body labored living it’s dying well

Let go and say good bye
into the bowels of the earth
into the evergreens
into the legacy of ancestry

Where we’ve been all along

The wheel continues spinning
a bell is struck
we are returned
one Eternal round




My father passed away peacefully in his home surrounded by family. As profoundly sad as I am not to have him physically near, his presence in my life is inextricable. He imbued a love of music in me and taught me that through singing I could bare my spirit’s inner landscape. 

Due to weather and travel conditions his burial fell on the winter solstice. What an unexpected gift it was to celebrate his transformation on this symbolic day. Gathered with family and friends, I performed ‘Any Longer’ in the little chapel built by ancestors whom had homesteaded the land 200 years ago. Though my body may never be buried in this family cemetery, on this day I let the architecture and the fleeting darkness absorb me. A bell is struck and the wheel continues spinning…

 

Maralie’s multi-mediated works emphasize the evolution of spiritual and emotional expression via technology and seduces poetics from human-machine interaction. Their/her research probes the multifaceted interrelationships of gender and spirituality as well as appropriated uses of technologies throughout time. Seer sees the unseen and sings Hosanna! Maralie’s work includes performance, sculpture, photography, video, and sound.  As a performer/vocalist/dancer, Maralie has toured more than a dozen countries with the projectsValise (solo), Humanbeast, Assembly of Light, Tem Eyos Ki, Bloodhuff, and Soophie Nun Squad. Their/her collaborations in choreography and dance have been seen in a Nick Cave Soundsuit performance, Bonedust’s Fruit of the Ash, and in Hana van der Kolk’s The Third Thing. Maralie’s work has also been featured in Vice Magazine, The Fader, and RISD Museum’s Manual online, among other publications. They/she has taught in RISD’s Experimental and Foundation Studies program and Brown University’s Modern Culture and Media Department.

Maralie’s multi-mediated works emphasize the evolution of spiritual and emotional expression via technology and seduces poetics from human-machine interaction. Their/her research probes the multifaceted interrelationships of gender and spirituality as well as appropriated uses of technologies throughout time. Seer sees the unseen and sings Hosanna! Maralie’s work includes performance, sculpture, photography, video, and sound.  As a performer/vocalist/dancer, Maralie has toured more than a dozen countries with the projectsValise (solo), Humanbeast, Assembly of LightTem Eyos KiBloodhuff, and Soophie Nun Squad. Their/her collaborations in choreography and dance have been seen in a Nick Cave Soundsuit performance, Bonedust’s Fruit of the Ash, and in Hana van der Kolk’s The Third Thing. Maralie’s work has also been featured in Vice Magazine, The Fader, and RISD Museum’s Manual online, among other publications. They/she has taught in RISD’s Experimental and Foundation Studies program and Brown University’s Modern Culture and Media Department.